The Sue Treagus Prize is awarded annually to the best poster presented by a student (undergraduate or postgraduate) at the Annual Meeting. The student must also be the first author and presenting largely their own original research. The winner is decided by a panel of invited judges.

Previously the Best Student Poster Prize, the TSG committee and members unanimously agreed to the renaming of the award to the Sue Treagus Prize at the TSG 2015 AGM (held in Edinburgh, January 2015).

Sue Treagus

Dr Sue Treagus is a structural geologist whose influence transcends her own research on folding, fabrics and strain variations in rocks. Sue served as chief editor of the Journal of Structural Geology for twelve years (1985-1997) and the journal today very much reflects her efforts.  Sue is a former chair of TSG and has been a passionate advocate for student participation at its meetings and for promoting breaking science in general. Sue graduated from Manchester and the Structural Geology MSc at Imperial College, followed by PhD researches back in Manchester on fold development. Since then her career has been Manchester based – with a string of research positions and fellowships. Sue retied from academia in 2003. She continues to hold an emeritus position in Manchester and is actively researching the structure of N Wales, especially Anglesey.
(with thanks to Professor Rob Butler for providing Sue’s profile).

Previous Winners

2020 – shared between Amy Hughes (University of Liverpool) – Investigating Wear Rate and Frictional Behaviour of Porous Geomaterials Using Sintered Glass Analogues

and Piotr Strzelecki (AGH University of Science and Technology, Poland) The occurrence of deformation bands in a fold-and-thrust belt – an example from the Silesian Nappe, Outer Carpathians, Poland

Special mention – Billy Andrews (University of Strathclyde) Fault mapping of UK Carboniferous Coal Measures over four orders of magnitude: insights into fault-rock development

Special mention – James Shaw (University of Leeds) Structural Controls on Orogenic Gold in Northern Ireland: Insights from the Curraghinalt Gold Deposit

2019 – Tara Stephens, (University of Leicester). Igneous sill geometry as a record of  tectonic horizontal compression

Special mention – Johannes Wiest (University of Bergen) Ductile structures in basement windows of the SW Scandinavian Caledonides and their potential for brittle reactivation.

2018 – Alexander Minor (KU Leven, Belgium)

2017 – Yukitsugu Totake (University of Aberdeen)

2016 – Benjamin Jost (Royal Holloway)

2015 – Anna-Maria Dichiarante (Durham University)

2014 – Lucy Campbell (University of Aberdeen)

2013 – Tetsuzo Fukunari (University of Royal Holloway)

2012 – unknown

2011 – unknown

2010 – Monica Müller (University of Vienna)

2009 – Richard Walker (Durham University)

2008 – Hein Van Ghendt (Aachen University)